Tips About Night Fishing

Posted on October 13, 2014. Filed under: Bass Fishing, Fishing Lights, Green Fishing Lights, Night Fishing | Tags: , , , , , , |

Night fishing is a little harder than fishing during the day. However, it is common throughout the reservoirs, lakes & rivers of the south and southeast when the summer months are too hot to fish. The water will be so warm that the fish will go deeper and deeper from the surface to find more oxygen, making them harder to catch. Many people night fish as a hobby, but it is important to take extra safety precautions and to be prepared for anything.

The most common types of night fishing are bass, crappie & catfish. Since bass move slow and they don’t move far, you should be able to find bass at the same places during the day and night. If you have a favorite fishing spot, they should still be there at night as well. The fish will also find spots near manufactured structures, downed trees, stumps, brush plies and along the banks. Anywhere there is a food source.

You will want to use a different tackle during the day than you would fishing at night. Being able to see will be limited, you will have to rely on the feel of the lure to determine whether you have a bite. Some of the lures that have been proven to give results are jigs, crank baits, plastic worms or live bait such as minnows.

When preparing to go fishing at night, you need to take some extra measures that you may not necessarily think about for a day trip. You should check the weather beforehand. You do not want to be caught in rain. You also need to make sure that your boat is in working order. This includes everything from batteries, all your tackle, life jackets,extra lights such as flash lights as well as making sure the lights on your boat are in prefect working order and always include a first aid kit for emergencies. The last thing that you will want is to have a problem.

You should be well aware of what you have and do not have in your tackle and toolboxes. Lights are obviously very important when fishing at night. Many anglers will use black lights, fluorescent green fishing lights, led or flood lights and some sort of fluorescent line. When the line is under the black light, it will have a neon glow and making it easier to see. You should have extra flashlights and a mounted light on your boat. You want to be safe and visible to other boats that may be night fishing.

Bass fish do not have great vision, so they will rely on their sense of smell during the night. You may want to consider live bait. If you go night fishing, you’ll not only need lights to see by, but Fishing Lights that draw fish close to your boat. Fishing Lights work by attracting tiny animals called plankton, which attract bait fish such as shad, herring and minnows, which in turn attract predator game fish such as bass, crappie, walleye, red fish, speckled trout and other species. Game fish gather near or in the circle of light to feed.

Plankton migrate to light. Green Fishing Lights has the best ability to cause this to happen. White works, too, but white light is absorbed very quickly in water. It doesn’t penetrate very deep so it’s less effective than green, which maintains its color character at much greater depths. Some bait fish and game fish are attracted directly to the lights rather than the plankton or bait, and once again, green is superior for this purpose. Green Fishing Lights have quickly become most prevalent.

Always put safety first. Everyone on board needs to wear your life jacket at all times when you are fishing at night. A flotation device is required and should be convenient. All the lights on the bow and stern of your boat should be on at all times when nights fishing. A first aid kit is a must. Don’t forget your insect repellent because mosquitoes are looking for a free meal, too. Make sure to abide by all current rules and regulations. When fishing during the day or night always put safety first.

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